International drug cartel money laundering system

Officials gathered at the Moakley Federal Courthouse in Boston on Tuesday to announce the results of an international investigation into the alleged laundering of millions of dollars in drug trafficking proceeds through banks, including some in Massachusetts. . According to US attorney Rachael Rollins, the case involves Colombian drug cartels who used the banking system in the United States and elsewhere to launder their drug proceeds. Rollins said the investigation spanned more than five years and involved the infiltration of the criminal organization, based in Colombia. In addition to Rollins, the announcement involved officials from the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Internal Revenue Service and law enforcement officials from Colombia and Jamaica. Rollins said all 19 suspects will face charges in the case, which involved the laundering of at least $6 million. Five of the suspects were arrested in Florida and Jamaica on Tuesday and 13 others were arrested in Colombia and Florida last month. “The defendants are alleged to have taken part in a conspiracy to transfer millions of dollars in drug proceeds from Colombian cartels through banks in the United States, including Massachusetts, and elsewhere. In doing so, they allegedly helped conceal drug trafficking activities and profits,” Rollins said. The network of suspects allegedly used a black market peso exchange in Colombia and a network of bank accounts held by shell companies or individuals to conduct their business. “Through money laundering schemes, these criminals repatriate drug proceeds, allowing them to reinvest in the production, transportation and distribution of more narcotics. Money is the fuel that allows them to to keep the cycle going. By attacking the financial structure, we have a greater impact on neutralizing their ability to spread their poison,” said Brian D. Boyle, Special Agent in Charge of the New England Field Division. of the DEA Photos of evidence displayed on either side of the podium during the announcement showed thousands of pounds of cocaine and bags full of cash seized as part of the investigation Photos of 19 suspects – including including couriers, business owners and brokers — were also exposed.Rollins said his office plans to seek the suspects’ extradition to Massachusetts, where they will face charges.

Officials gathered at the Moakley Federal Courthouse in Boston on Tuesday to announce the results of an international investigation into the alleged laundering of millions of dollars in drug trafficking proceeds through banks, including some in Massachusetts. .

According to US attorney Rachael Rollins, the case involves Colombian drug cartels who used the banking system in the United States and elsewhere to launder their drug proceeds. Rollins said the investigation spanned more than five years and involved the infiltration of the criminal organization, based in Colombia.

In addition to Rollins, the announcement involved officials from the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Internal Revenue Service and law enforcement officials from Colombia and Jamaica.

Rollins said all 19 suspects will face charges in the case, which involved the laundering of at least $6 million. Five of the suspects were arrested in Florida and Jamaica on Tuesday and 13 others were arrested in Colombia and Florida last month.

“The defendants are alleged to have taken part in a conspiracy to transfer millions of dollars in drug proceeds from Colombian cartels through banks in the United States, including Massachusetts, and elsewhere. In doing so, they allegedly helped conceal drug trafficking activities and profits,” Rollins said.

The network of suspects allegedly used a black market peso exchange in Colombia and a network of bank accounts held by shell companies or individuals to conduct their business.

“Through money laundering schemes, these criminals repatriate drug proceeds, allowing them to reinvest in the production, transportation and distribution of more narcotics. Money is the fuel that allows them to to keep the cycle going. By attacking the financial structure, we have a greater impact on neutralizing their ability to spread their poison,” said Brian D. Boyle, Special Agent in Charge of the New England Field Division. from the DEA.

Photos of evidence displayed on either side of the podium during the announcement showed thousands of pounds of cocaine and bags full of cash seized as part of the investigation. Photos of 19 suspects – including couriers, business owners and brokers – were also on display.

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Suspects identified in international conspiracy case

Rollins said his office plans to seek the suspects’ extradition to Massachusetts, where they will face charges.